Hundreds of Baby Sea Turtles Saved From Rip Currents

This conservation win came out of Volusia County Florida. After hatching from their eggs, hundreds of baby sea turtles started their journey out into the ocean.

Image Source: State of Queensland

Their destination? The seaweed line in the Gulf Stream. This area has lots of food which gives the baby sea turtles a chance to feed and grow.

What a seaweed line looks like
Image Source: arcgis.com

Unfortunately for these sea turtles, there were rip currents – which is a natural occurrence – that day. In order to reach the Gulf Stream seaweed line, these little ones have to swim out 40 to 50 miles. Rip currents can make that a very difficult – if not an impossible feat. As the sea turtles washed back ashore, they were found to be dehydrated and lethargic. Because sea turtles are endangered, humans have been stepping in so that we can ensure that they get a good start in life and ultimately thrive on their own.

Luckily for these sea turtles the Marine Science Center in Ponce Inlet has a sea turtle rehab center. At the center, the baby sea turtles are able to rest, get the fluids that they need and proper nourishment. Once they are strong enough and conditions are favorable, they are released back into the ocean in order to start their journey.

Image Source: TripAdvisor

There overt 400 sea turtles that were saved by the center and driven by car to South Florida where they were then taken by boat to the Gulf Stream seaweed line.

Efforts like these have saved countless baby sea turtles and given them a helpful boost in order to start them off on the right foot and ultimately thrive! For 2019 alone a new sea turtle nest record was reached – the highest in 10 years – just in Southwest Florida alone!

Image Source: Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium

To support efforts like these, visit your local marine center or donate to one online. Here is a list of centers and organizations worldwide: http://www.seaturtle.org/groups/

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